Legal Blog: Appellate Practice

blank

Fourth Circuit Update: United States v. Alan Williams

On July 20, 2021, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decided Appeal Number 20-4120, United States v. Alan Williams. Judge Rushing wrote for the Court. Judges Agee and Harris joined the opinion. In itself, the Court’s decision is not particularly interesting. Rather, what we find remarkable about it is how it illustrates the contrast between how courts

Read More »
blank

Fourth Circuit Update: United States v. Comer

On July 21, 2021, the Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit decided Appeal Number 19-4466, United States v. Marysa Renee Comer. Judge Wynn wrote for the Court. Judges Keenan and Thacker joined the opinion. In a sentence, the Court approved a condition of supervised release that prohibited use of social media with permission from the U.S. Probation Office. This

Read More »
blank

The Scope of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act After Van Buren

By Jonathan Knowles – We have previously examined United States v. Van Buren, then pending before the Supreme Court of the United States. On June 3, 2021, the Supreme Court issued its opinion interpreting the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act of 1986. The Court limited violations of the Act to access of information that a person is never authorized to

Read More »
blank

Could I Be Prosecuted for Using Facebook at Work? Supreme Court to Decide.

In April 2020, the Supreme Court agreed to hear Van Buren v. United States.  This case raises questions about what constitutes criminal “computer misuse” under 18 U.S.C. § 1030(a).  The petitioner, Mr. Van Buren, was convicted under 18 U.S.C. § 1030(a) after accepting a loan in exchange for personal records obtained through a police database.  As a police officer, Mr.

Read More »

Lynch v. Dimaya, Where The Johnson Court Is Headed, And How It May Get There

Last Tuesday, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Lynch v. Dimaya, a case challenging the constitutionality of 18 U.S.C. § 16(b), which defines the term “crime of violence.”  As a firm, we frequently encounter these issues in our practice, and as a result have been closely following the Dimaya case. You can read our post: “Violent Felony” And “Crime

Read More »

“Violent Felony” And “Crime of Violence”: What Johnson v. United States Can Mean For Other Federal Criminal Statutes Involving Violent Crimes

In 2015, the Supreme Court decided Johnson v. United States. The decision struck down part of the federal Armed Career Criminal Act of 1984 (“ACCA”), which defined a legal term: “violent felony,” used for some federal crimes. As noted in a recent article from the Washington Post, hundreds, if not thousands, of prisoners can expect to have their prison sentences reduced

Read More »
Categories
Tags

Defending Your Rights
In Federal Court

Contact us Now

What Our Clients Have To say...

Top